The Importance of a few cities in Black History!!!

    The Importance of each city in Black History

Kwame Ture, Formerly Known as Stokely Carmichael, Lectures on Pan-Africanism

Well, we all know that each city in America ended slavery in different years.Every city had a special role and was peculiar. What did our black people go through during this time era? What are the statistics?

In 1910, about 50 years after the Civil War, 89% of all black people resided
in the South. 80% of these are in rural areas. By 1913, a collection of
tragedies destroyed the cotton crop. World cotton prices went down
like cold weather temperatures. Boll weevils infested large areas and
in 1915 brutal floods took over the Mississippi Valley.

Farmers Lost Everything they had.

While under Jim Crow laws, many African American sharecroppers and
tenant farmers dove deeply into debt or lost what they had. Simultaneously,
World War I had slowed down foreign immigration to the northern cities
while the demand grew for industrial goods. Therefore, producing
a severe labor shortage in both northern and western cities.

Mass Migration went North

The Great Migration was a major event that involved black people move
in search of urban jobs. During the periods of 1915-1920, a million
black people moved to northern cities. Another million joined them
in the decade that came later. In addition to that, tens of thousands
of blacks went west, specifically California, while 700,000 black
people moved down south.

The Great Migration slowed during the Depression, with one fourth
of all blacks lived in North or West during the year 1940. The pattern
continued during and after World War II. By the year 1960, 40% of
all blacks lived outside the South, and 75% of all blacks lived
in cities. More black people transformed their rural southern
backgrounds to fit their new urban homes and that in turn created
a new black culture.

Atlanta’s Role in Black History

African AMericans did not heavily flow into Atlanta until after the
Civil War. In the late 1800s, nearly half of Atlanta’s residents
were black. The City, however stayed racially polarized. In 1915,
Atlanta became the area for the KKK. By the 1960s, Dr Martin
Luther King Jr, showed as the leader of the civil rights movement
making the city even more prominent. The Martin Luther King jr
National Historic Site, is the King Center for Social Justice,
and the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Birmingham’s Role in Black History

IN 1963, Birmingham became an horrific chapter in civil
rights movement when four young black girls attended Sunday
school and got killed by a bomb. It exploded at the 16th street
Baptist Church. There, Martin Luther King was arrested and jailed
during the anti-segregation protests and that’s where he wrote
his famous Letter from Birmingham CIty Jail, talking about
people having the right to disobey unjust laws. The horrible
images of Bull Connor’s police dogs attacking black marchers
helped alert people to southern racism.

Boston’s Role in Black History

In Boston, they had the abolitionist movement by 1700 and it was
an important slave port in the 1600s. THe Commonwealth of Massachusetts
ended slavery in the year 1783 and in the 1830s era Boston had
become the center of American abolitionist sentiment. The 54th,
Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantr, a black unit from
Boston, fought in the Civil War. Yet, the Great Migration
had little affect on Boston, the city has received substantial
immigration from the Carribean in recent decades.

In closing, here’s a little quote: “The past is important because it
produces the present.

http://www.factmonster.com/spot/bhmcities1.html

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