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The cartoon character Betty Boop was inspired by a black jazz singer in Harlem!

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Well, we are the originals.They are copies. White

people stole credit on different things that black people did.

Black people have invented alot to help the world be better

and make our lives easier.  We black people are the inspiration

for ideas, concepts, sciences, math, education, style, music,

dance, and much more.

Thus, I’m speaking about the iconic cartoon character Betty

Boop, who was inspired by a black jazz singer in Harlem. Max Fleischer

introduced her in 1930. She was the first and most famous sex symbol in

animation. Betty Boop is  well known for her revealing dress,

curvaceous figure and signature vocals BOOp OOP a Doop.

While there has been controversy over the years, the inspiration has been

traced back to Esther Jones who was known as Baby Esher and performed

mostly in the Cotton Club during the 1920s.

Baby Esther’s trademark vocal style of using boops and other

childlike scat sounds gained the attention of actress Helene Kane

during a performance in the late 20s. After observing Baby Esther,

Kane took on her style and began using boops in her songs as well.

Helene Kane, who found fame earlier on, often included this baby style

into her music. When Betty Boop was introduced, Kane promptly sued

Fleischer and Paramount Publix Corporation informing the public

that they were using her image and style.

Video evidence came to the light of Baby Esther performing

in a nightclub. The courts then ruled that Helene Kane did not

have the exclusive rights to the booping style or image and it predated her.

Baby Esther’s baby style did not bring her mainstream fame and she died

in obscurity. Yet, a piece of her lives on in the iconic character Betty

Boop.

We don’t learn this type of material inside schools usually so

you just have to dig deeper. What else don’t we know about black history?

Well, we need to learn it because everything about black history matters.

http://www.pbs.org/black-culture/explore/10-black-history-little-known-facts/#.Wf4XZ9KnHcs

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Symphony Potato Chips, a Black owned family business consists of all natural gluten free potato chips!

Potato chips day

Who loves potato chips?  With so many flavors, you get

more and more excited about them.Many people love potato chips. I am one of those

people who love potato chips . Well, if you like or even love potato chips

Symphony Potato Chips , a black owned family business based in Atlanta

is at your service. That is ,in certain areas. Symphony Potato Chips

is rapidly becoming a household name. Dondre Anderson and his two daughters,

Amina and Amari launched this company.

 

Word has quickly spread about their gourmet seasoned, all natural gluten

free potato chips.  The company gets orders daily from 41 states.

Sales have come from the southeast, northeast, midwest and even

Hawaii. Dondre admitts they have had sales success in all but 9 states.

See? They taking over. Anderson encourages everyone to visit their

website http://www.symphonychips.com and place an order for a chance to

win a free 12 pack of chips. How sweet!

 

Their original flavor has been responsible for all their success,

but they are to soon release a new flavor called Smoked. The new flavor

was designed with smoked bbq in mind but with a gourmet twist.

Chef Andre says ” WHile others are searching for flavors for you to

snack on, we are providing a gourmet flavor you can feast on.” With

all the great feedback from Symphony’s Chips original flavor, they

are confident that their customers anticipate their new flavor. They

make sure to stay humble and disciplined.

Now, what a story! Have you heard of them ? Do they cater to your state?

http://mobile.eurweb.com/2017/10/black-family-owned-potato-chip-brand-serves-41-states/#

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Black Seamen served vital roles!

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How many black seamen have you heard of? Did you hear of James

Forten? Anyways, Black people have taken on many roles in life. So I try to

think of the roles that black people take the least of. There are

roles that black people take the most of . But I like to highlight

something special about each role that black people do

and how we as black people have shown our brilliance. Moving on.

The Navy recruited both the free and enslave black people

from the start of the Revolutionary War. Many black people were already

experienced sailors that served in British and state navies. Philadelphia’s

free blacks were more likely to serve on privateers than in the

Pennsylvania navy. Black seamen were specifically valued as pilots.

Others took on roles as shipyard carpenters and laborers.

Maryland and Virginia’s navies made extensive use of blacks, even

buying slaves for wartime naval service. Virginia’s state commissioner

noted that it was cheaper to hire blacks than whites and that white

people got exemption from military service by substituting a slave.

In his memoirs, US. Navy Commodore James Barron, who served

as a captain in the Virginia navy during the war, remembered

several black men among the “Courageous patriots who…in justice

to their merits should not be forgotten.

Whatever we do, we do it big” by me.

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part2/2p51.html

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The US Capitol, Mount Vernon, Wall Street and more Buildings were built by Black Slaves!

Severe Storms at the US Capitol

Black History is everyday. Therefore it should be celebrated everyday.

Black people have alot of accomplishments and inventions. It’s more

than just sports and music, black people once dominated more areas

of life than you notice today. We know the story of black people being

slaves, but ofcourse that is not the full story. Slaves did more than

work in the cotton fields. They invented and re invented and

invented some more. Boo-yah!

Slave labor went into the building of the capitol. The area where

the legislative center of the US sits formerly known as Jenkins Hill. This

hill was a heavily forested area that needed extensive landscaping, as

well as trench digging for the foundation from slaves. This was all before

George Washington laid the cornerstone in 1793. According to Fred Beuttler,

a historian for the House of Representatives, one of the buildings most iconic

symbols, the brass Statue of Freedom, was in part, done through the

diligence of Philip Reid, a former slave. Some of the sandstone in the old east

front of the building has the names of slave laborers who had

cut the stone.

The country’s financial center was named the same name that

a wall  was named. That wall was built in 1653 to protect settlers from Indian raids.

Freed and enslaved Africans made up a significant part of the labor pool

that created that well, just like the other infrastructure and buildings

in what is currently Lower Manhattan, including Trinity CHurch. There

was a slave market at Wall and Water streets, and slave ships would

leave at South Street Seaport. According to the church’s archivist,

the parish, which was founded in 1696,used slave labor at several points

during its early history. Many early members contribute slaves to build

the initial church.

Mount Vernon,  the home and plantation of the nation’s first

president survived on the labor of hundreds of slaves owned by

George and Martha Washington. These slaves specialized in various

trades, including woodworking and blacksmithing. Most of the structures

spread across the grounds of Mount Vernon, includiings a 16 sided barn

for grain processing and storage, were built by slave laborers and carpenters

often overseen by Thomas Green.

You will find those 3 places listed above and more

places black slaves built on the website.  Two thumbs of for black people doing

your thang with pride.  Your quote for the day is “I work hard now, so I can have it

easier later on” (by me) Oh, and black people still excel outside and

inside of sports and music today just like in the past. Wake up!

https://www.curbed.com/maps/slave-labor-white-house-united-states-michelle-obama

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African Hairstyles-Styles of Yesterday and Today!

First, I want to show much appreciation for the beauty and style of the

black race. Among thinking about such themes, I decided to look

up books that talked about African hairstyles. I then found this

book called “African Hairstyles-Styles of Yesterday and Today.

This book discusses the hairstyles of Black Egyptians. It expressed

that ancient black Africans used beeswax to preserve their

braids and twists. Throughout the book you will also find that Black

Africans were cowrie shells and coins in their hair.

The women in the Bapoto area styled the men’s hair

in cone and mitre shapes. There’s even a presentation of

black people and their African tribes. “African Hairstyles-Styles of

Yesterday and Today” balances the Black African men and Black

African women hairstyles. You wanna see the many ways you can

do cornrows? Check out this book. You get that. You also get a

history of the African hairstyles.Some of the cornrows extend

into a bun, curve at an angle, and have red clay incorporated in it

and animal fat. These fancy African  cornrowed hairstlyes have

some type of curls embodied within them.  One particular

hairstyle show reminds me so much of the pyramids. Their

many hairstyles compliment their African facial features.

Some of their  hairstyles even accompany beads.

I love this book with all my heart. It gives fine details.

Besides the fact that it puts on a display of African hairstyles,

it lists the process of threading. It shows that you can do

a billion more things with African hairstyles than just an

ordinary one. By the way, you’ll notice Caucasians

in this book sporting hairstyles that are originally made

by Black Africans. You might want to purchase or even

borrow this book. Ladies… Gentleman…You’re gonna love it.

Information on the book

Title- African Hairstyles : Styles of Yesterday and Today

Author- Esi Sagay   Published by Heinemann in London

Ibadan, and Narobi       Copyrighted 1983.

 

 

 

 

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I strutted around town in my Egyptian costume on Halloween ! (Pictures inside)

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I Tamarva, have always loved Halloween. The main reason

I love Halloween is because I get to dress up. I love, love, love

to dress up. So this year I ordered an Egytpian costume. This

costume comes with the multi-colored jewel collar, the black

and gold dress, the gold belt, and the wig.I bought the Egyptian

headdress separately. I also got the lipstick and eyeliner. I didn’t

wear the face stones until a few days after. I was not able

to duplicate the eye of horus around the lining of my eye.

I didn’t wear the fake eyelashes. I was not able to find the

perfect shoes for the outfit until I stumbled upon Payless.

I went into that store and saw some fine shiny black shoes

with a wonderful slant to them. They were $25.99. It costs

me over $50.00 for the outfit and accessories. Oh, and

Happy Belated Halloween! I was supposed to do this

post earlier. Peace!DesiSmileys.com

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The Secret of the Stones, a magic book involving black children who turn back and forth from human to stones!

 


Photo credit: Anton Vakulenko via Foter.com / CC BY-SA

I have wanted to write children’s stories for the longest.

I’ve always thought in order to write children’s I have to understand children.

I have to get inside the mind of a child. I know there are three things

important to a story: desire, obstacle, and resolution. These are

just three of the important things in a story. When I read “The Secret

of the Stones” I was truly amazed. Now let me give you a brief

synopsis. “The secret of the stones” is a story about a black

couple having no children.

They stumble upon two stones that

they take back home. These stones turned into a black orphan

boy and black orphan girl. They do all the cleaning and housework

while the black couple is out but disappear when they return.

They were spotted due to a neighbor. Yet, they had to get a

magic charm to make the children reappear briefly. Then,

they finally figure out how to take off the spell permanently,

so that the children never disappear. I love this happy story.

The whole concept of the story takes my mind to another place.

I wish this story was possible in real life. I describe the

story as mysterious. I had so much fun reading this.

The whole perspective is fresh and new. It impressed me

compared to the other children’s books I read but didn’t

get into. I rate this story a 10 out of 10 and it is number 1

out of my top 10.

The story is called “The Secret of the Stones” and it is

retold by Robert. D. San SOuci. The pictures

are by James Ransome. The publisher is Phyllis Fogelman

books and the state of publishing is New York.

Photo credit: Anton Vakulenko via Foter.com / CC BY-SA