African american Culture · African American History · African American Inventors · African American man · African American media · African American men · African American news · African American woman · African American Women · Black Culture · black inventors · Black Men · black news · black people · youtube

Symphony Potato Chips, a Black owned family business consists of all natural gluten free potato chips!

Potato chips day

Who loves potato chips?  With so many flavors, you get

more and more excited about them.Many people love potato chips. I am one of those

people who love potato chips . Well, if you like or even love potato chips

Symphony Potato Chips , a black owned family business based in Atlanta

is at your service. That is ,in certain areas. Symphony Potato Chips

is rapidly becoming a household name. Dondre Anderson and his two daughters,

Amina and Amari launched this company.

 

Word has quickly spread about their gourmet seasoned, all natural gluten

free potato chips.  The company gets orders daily from 41 states.

Sales have come from the southeast, northeast, midwest and even

Hawaii. Dondre admitts they have had sales success in all but 9 states.

See? They taking over. Anderson encourages everyone to visit their

website http://www.symphonychips.com and place an order for a chance to

win a free 12 pack of chips. How sweet!

 

Their original flavor has been responsible for all their success,

but they are to soon release a new flavor called Smoked. The new flavor

was designed with smoked bbq in mind but with a gourmet twist.

Chef Andre says ” WHile others are searching for flavors for you to

snack on, we are providing a gourmet flavor you can feast on.” With

all the great feedback from Symphony’s Chips original flavor, they

are confident that their customers anticipate their new flavor. They

make sure to stay humble and disciplined.

Now, what a story! Have you heard of them ? Do they cater to your state?

http://mobile.eurweb.com/2017/10/black-family-owned-potato-chip-brand-serves-41-states/#

Advertisements
African American Inventors · African American man · African American media · African American men · African American news · African American woman · African American Women · african americans · black history · black inventors · Black Man · black media · Black Men · black musicians · black news · black people · black tap dancer · black woman · Black Women · youtube

William Henry Lane created American tap dance from blending African rhythms and Irish jig and reel!

 Tap Shoes//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

There’s so many types of dances. Can you count them all? I mean

every single one. I love to dance freestyle to Rihanna’s music.

I swear she have some of the best remixes and original songs

I’ve ever heard. Her music inspires me to dance the days away.

Enough about that. The reason I’m writing is to tell the story of

a Black man who is influential in the creation of American

tap dance.

Lane developed a unique way of using his body as a

musical instrument, combining African derived syncopated

rhythms with movements of the Irish jig and reel. He was free

born in Providence, Rhode Island around 1825. Lane started

to learn the Irish jig and reel from Uncle Jim Lowe, a dance

hall and saloon performer in New York City, New York.

By the age of ten, Lane was performing in Paradise Square

in the Five Points District of New York, where a heavy concentration

of African AMerican and Irish populations were side by side. The

vernacular dance forms of both of these ethnic group intermingled,

providing Lane opportunity to get the different rhythmic and movement

foundations that facilitated the development of his style of dance.

Lance has an original use of different areas of his feet to

create rhythms, keep time, and  improvise complex syncopated

rhythms. This was revolutionary for the 1840s. He used his heels

to make the deeper tones of the bass drum, and balls of his feet to

layer, softer higher sounds. And to keep with his African oral traditions,

Lane included singing and laughter into his performances. This

added another layer to his rhythmic creations.
 

  The combining of the rhythm, footwork, improvisation

and vocals, Lane formed a blended style of African dance and British

Isles folk dance still seen today. Students studying tap in the

21st century can give credit to the styles they learn from Lane.

This man I must say is like a human instrument. What a way to stand out!

I just had to give this man credit. He is better than ordinary, he is

extraordinary. We need more people like him. By the way, did you know

dancers and choreographers make 16.85 per hour according to the
bureau of labor statisitics? (https://www.bls.gov/ooh/entertainment-and-
sports/dancers-and-choreographers.htm)

http://www.blackpast.org/aah/lane-william-henry-master-juba-1825-c-1852

 

African American History · African American Inventors · African American man · African American media · African American men · African American scientist · african american students · African American woman · African American Women · african americans · black inventors · Black Man · black media · Black Men · black news · black people · black woman · Black Women · youtube

The US Capitol, Mount Vernon, Wall Street and more Buildings were built by Black Slaves!

Severe Storms at the US Capitol

Black History is everyday. Therefore it should be celebrated everyday.

Black people have alot of accomplishments and inventions. It’s more

than just sports and music, black people once dominated more areas

of life than you notice today. We know the story of black people being

slaves, but ofcourse that is not the full story. Slaves did more than

work in the cotton fields. They invented and re invented and

invented some more. Boo-yah!

Slave labor went into the building of the capitol. The area where

the legislative center of the US sits formerly known as Jenkins Hill. This

hill was a heavily forested area that needed extensive landscaping, as

well as trench digging for the foundation from slaves. This was all before

George Washington laid the cornerstone in 1793. According to Fred Beuttler,

a historian for the House of Representatives, one of the buildings most iconic

symbols, the brass Statue of Freedom, was in part, done through the

diligence of Philip Reid, a former slave. Some of the sandstone in the old east

front of the building has the names of slave laborers who had

cut the stone.

The country’s financial center was named the same name that

a wall  was named. That wall was built in 1653 to protect settlers from Indian raids.

Freed and enslaved Africans made up a significant part of the labor pool

that created that well, just like the other infrastructure and buildings

in what is currently Lower Manhattan, including Trinity CHurch. There

was a slave market at Wall and Water streets, and slave ships would

leave at South Street Seaport. According to the church’s archivist,

the parish, which was founded in 1696,used slave labor at several points

during its early history. Many early members contribute slaves to build

the initial church.

Mount Vernon,  the home and plantation of the nation’s first

president survived on the labor of hundreds of slaves owned by

George and Martha Washington. These slaves specialized in various

trades, including woodworking and blacksmithing. Most of the structures

spread across the grounds of Mount Vernon, includiings a 16 sided barn

for grain processing and storage, were built by slave laborers and carpenters

often overseen by Thomas Green.

You will find those 3 places listed above and more

places black slaves built on the website.  Two thumbs of for black people doing

your thang with pride.  Your quote for the day is “I work hard now, so I can have it

easier later on” (by me) Oh, and black people still excel outside and

inside of sports and music today just like in the past. Wake up!

https://www.curbed.com/maps/slave-labor-white-house-united-states-michelle-obama

African American Inventors · African American man · African American media · African American men · African American news · African American scientist · African American woman · African American Women · african americans · Black Americans · Black Man · Black Men · black news · black people · black woman · Black Women · youtube

African American Jemiah Battle Inventor creates Heart Detection Bracelet to Prevent Heart Attacks!

 

What is one of the top thing we humans must look out for? Okay,

take a guess. If you guesses health, you would be right.

Based on AMerican Heart Association’s findings, heart disease

is the Number 1 killer for all Americans and stroke is also the main

cause of death. The statistics for African Americans are more serious with

44% OF MEN AND 48% OF WOMEN having some form of

cardiovascular disease. Jemiah Battle states” Something had to be done. I have

suffered many losses with family members and friends, decided it was

time to get get busy and invent the life E Bracelet, which saves lives in

real time and promote self care.

Battle, author, transformational emotional life coach and CEO

of VK3 Innovations, has been working diligently to change the world with

his emotional fitness workshops.  Battle says “MY company specializes in

bringing  life changing products and innovations of the market in a bid

to improve, safeguard, and enhance one’s health and mental well being through

self care. The goal is to create awareness, through information, about heart

disease in the black community: and how minorities, especially women, are at

high risk or stroke or heart attack through education. I think the Life E- Bracelet

can help save many lives, brings mindfulness to stress, emotional health, and

wellness.”

He most recently received a patent for the first of its kind. The Life E

Bracelet,the innovative bracelet provides a wristband for monitoring

vital signs to help alert users to the risk of an oncoming heart attack. This

bracelet/wristbandincludes a digital display monitor and various sensors to

observe your blood pressure, pulse, stress, and other heart related readings.

One of the main features of this design is the ability for the band to

light up in various colors to show different levels of heart rate/blood pressure.

The band  illuminates in red, yellow, green, and blue in order to notify its

user of what to do. The band is able to  let the user know when their blood

pressure is getting to a dangerous level and/ or they are at risk of a heart

attack. The device also has a wireless notification system to alert family or

emergency contacts of a very special situation. The wristband is amazing

because it’s adjustable, in size, to help different individuals.

Get involved please. Your donations support cost of revenue,

research and development, sales and marketing, general and administrative,

etc. I shortened this article, but this article is worth reading at its original

site. I love the features of this invention. It is very much needed today.

It is convenient. It will save a life. So go ahead and spread the word.

Go ahead and use it.

 

 

 

http://www.blacknews.com/news/jemiah-battle-african-american-entreprepreneur-life-e-bracelet-heart-detection-bracelet-to-stave-off-heart-attack/#.WVFDJ9IrLcs

his

African American History · African American Inventors · African American man · African American media · African American men · African American news · African American scientist · African American woman · African American Women · african americans · Black Culture · black history · black woman · Black Women · youtube

Martin Davis, a young African American designer for General Motors designs cars!

 

 

chrysler I’ve seen so many cars. I see my top three favorite cars most

often. So I decided to look up which cars are designed by

African Americans. I knew this would be a fun topic.

So listen, his is what  I found. Martin Davis, a

black man has led the exterior lighting and design studio

for the automaker’s North American division, the team responsible

for the exterior lighting for every brand under the General Motors

umbrella.

Davis knew he had a love for design and innovation since elementary

school. HE did not like the HOT wheels and lego sets. They just

did not keep his attention. He also did not like the toys in

toy stores, so this creative black youth made his own.

The Detroit area native collected empty cardboard boxes used to transport

fruits and veggies from the grocery store. He brung them home and just

started cutting. He molded shapes with glue, tape and constructions

paper.. Their was a small closet in the entryway of his parents house,

with enough room for a chair and his creations, interior designs for

a car that includes a dashboard and center console. He invited

his friends to test drive the car and come out with a new model

once a month.

His father thought kids playing with cardboard in their

closet was a safety concern. Thus he shut the operation down.

He still sent his sketches into Ford and was just in middle school.

He waited and thought nothing would come of his work. A

Ford employee sent his work to the design department. He

got a follow up letter from the design department with some

career advice and a list of schools. HE really really wanted

to attend the College for Creative Studies in detroit , michigan

out of the choices he had been sent.

He got the design managers attention and they took his

sketches and plastered them on a 20 foot wall in his studio

at GM. The auto company allowed him the opportunity to

travel to Birmingham, England to work at an advanced

design studio that mainly focused on Cadillacs.

Davis and his team were responsible for the exterior lighting

responsibilities for three well known programs- the GMC Acadia, Chevy

Traverse, and the Buick Enclave. And as you can see,

this is a process. He worked and worked to master

his craft. You must do one step before you can make

the other . There’s more to the story of the brilliant black man

in the car designing, here:

http://www.blackpressusa.com/black-designer-lights-up-gm/

 

 

 

 

African american Culture · African American History · African American Inventors · African American man · African American media · African American men · African American news · African American Women · african americans · Black Culture · black history · Black Man · black media · Black Men · black news · black people · black woman · Black Women · youtube

Black owned Hospitals

stethoscope photo: Steth_on_Money steth_on_money.jpg

I mean here in Michigan I see alot of White doctors.
I’m like, where are the black doctors. There is
surely a need for them. I would love to see
more black doctors, both dark and yellow in color.
It don’t make sense for everything to be so white.
Yes, whites have their roles,but I would like to
see more black people as doctors. Now, let’s move
on to black hospitals. Where are the black hospitals?
I surely don’t know of any in michigan. Here are
some black hospitals for your viewing:

Freedmen’s Hospital was founded 1862 in Washington
by the Medical Division of the Freedmen’s Bureau
to give the medical care to slaves. This hospital
was located on the grounds belonging to
Howard University and was the only Federally
funded health care facility for blacks in the
nation.

It’s still around Howard University Hospital,
one of only 3 traditional black hospitals
left around. The Freedmen’s Bureau
stayed around for 4 years. During that time
a movement was started that paved the way
for some ninety new Negro Hospitals.

Lincoln Hospital was established by Dr. Aaron
MCDuffie Moore in 1901 when he convinced
Washington Duke that a hospital would be a
more useful thing than Duke’s idea of
building a monument on the Trinity Campus
to Honor negroes who had fought for the
confederacy.

Provident Hospital and Training School for Nurses,
the first black owned and operated hospital
in America, was established in 1891 by
Dr. Daniel Hale Williams. Provident provided
training for nursese and interns in Chicago.
Black patients were denied admission to
white hospitals. Therefore, black physicians
could not treat their patients.

In 1944, there were 125 black hospitals in America
catering to black patients. Of these 124 hospitals,
23 were fully approved by the American College
of Surgeons and three were provisionally approved.
these institutions were found in 23 states and the
District of Columbia.

Oh, and now that I think about it i saw a black
woman doctor in Deaborn Heights, Michigan. It was
refreshing and such a change.

Saint Agnes Hospital founded 1886 in Raleigh,
North Carolina on the grounds of St. Augustine’s College.
It had its share of handicaps. Despite that , it
was only well equipped hospital for blacks
between Washington And New Orleans. It served
North Carolina, adjacent Virginia and South Carolina.

http://guides.mclibrary.duke.edu/blackhistorymonth/hospitals

African American History · African American Inventors · African American man · African American men · African American woman · African American Women · black history · education · school

10 of the Best historical Landmarks that Highlight Black History!

frederick douglass photo: HS-FD Frederick Douglass FrederickDouglass.jpg

Well, we know black history is 365 days a year. February is too
limited. Black History is one of the most important subjects
to know. Knowing our history allows us not to be lost in a
sea of illusion. So when I find out some things about black
history I’m ready to let the world know.

If you go to Alabama, you’re in for a treat. You might have the
chance to visit the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. This museum
was the first to save the information on the history of the modern
civil rights movement. The building chronicles the Freedom Rides, the Children’s March and more key historic moments. You can find it located at the city’s CIvil Rights District across the street from 16th Street Baptist Church.

The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum and American Jazz Museum. The jazz
museum is deeply rooted in African AMerican history.

The National Civil Rights Museum is the site built around the
Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King Jr. was killed in 1968. It
also has the boarding house from which his assassin James Earl
Ray fired the shot.

The DUsable Museum of African AMerican History is one of the
nation’s top museums of African AMerican History. They give
details on the history of blacks in the Armed Services.

The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is the
nation’s largest black history museum and schedules exhibits on
African AMericans in science to liberation. This is the spot to
see when you go to Detroit, Michigan.

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is located
on the OHio River and has this view of the waterway that
represented freedom for runaway slaves fleeing from Kentucky
on the south shore. The exhibits there include a slave pen and
a film narrated by Oprah Winfrey.

The Museum of African American History is located in Boston and
Nantucket, Massuchesetts. One of the two buildings that is involved
in the museum’s Boston campus, the African Meeting House was built
by black artisans and echoes the history. Go there and you can stand
in the same pulpit were Frederick DOuglass stood.

The Museum of the African Diaspora is San Francisco. This particular
institution is centered around the idea that all humanity can trace
back it’s roots to the African continent.

The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American
History and CUlture is in Baltimore. The building’s peculiar
desicn was inspired by a slave ship. It was built by one of
the country’s leading African American architects Philip G.
Freelon who is also planning the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

The International Civil RIghts Center & Museum is another historical
landmark for Black History. One of the most important
moments in the civil rights movement occured in 1960 when 4
college students did a sit in at a WOolworh Counter after
they were refused service because of their race.

This information sounds all around interesting and I will
be glad when I can travel to these specific locations. There
are some things I need to see there and some knowledge I need
to take away from there.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/travel/destinations/10greatplaces/2014/02/13/black-history-african-american-museum/5453527/