African Hairstyles-Styles of Yesterday and Today!

First, I want to show much appreciation for the beauty and style of the

black race. Among thinking about such themes, I decided to look

up books that talked about African hairstyles. I then found this

book called “African Hairstyles-Styles of Yesterday and Today.

This book discusses the hairstyles of Black Egyptians. It expressed

that ancient black Africans used beeswax to preserve their

braids and twists. Throughout the book you will also find that Black

Africans were cowrie shells and coins in their hair.

The women in the Bapoto area styled the men’s hair

in cone and mitre shapes. There’s even a presentation of

black people and their African tribes. “African Hairstyles-Styles of

Yesterday and Today” balances the Black African men and Black

African women hairstyles. You wanna see the many ways you can

do cornrows? Check out this book. You get that. You also get a

history of the African hairstyles.Some of the cornrows extend

into a bun, curve at an angle, and have red clay incorporated in it

and animal fat. These fancy African  cornrowed hairstlyes have

some type of curls embodied within them.  One particular

hairstyle show reminds me so much of the pyramids. Their

many hairstyles compliment their African facial features.

Some of their  hairstyles even accompany beads.

I love this book with all my heart. It gives fine details.

Besides the fact that it puts on a display of African hairstyles,

it lists the process of threading. It shows that you can do

a billion more things with African hairstyles than just an

ordinary one. By the way, you’ll notice Caucasians

in this book sporting hairstyles that are originally made

by Black Africans. You might want to purchase or even

borrow this book. Ladies… Gentleman…You’re gonna love it.

Information on the book

Title- African Hairstyles : Styles of Yesterday and Today

Author- Esi Sagay   Published by Heinemann in London

Ibadan, and Narobi       Copyrighted 1983.

 

 

 

 

The Secret of the Stones, a magic book involving black children who turn back and forth from human to stones!

 


Photo credit: Anton Vakulenko via Foter.com / CC BY-SA

I have wanted to write children’s stories for the longest.

I’ve always thought in order to write children’s I have to understand children.

I have to get inside the mind of a child. I know there are three things

important to a story: desire, obstacle, and resolution. These are

just three of the important things in a story. When I read “The Secret

of the Stones” I was truly amazed. Now let me give you a brief

synopsis. “The secret of the stones” is a story about a black

couple having no children.

They stumble upon two stones that

they take back home. These stones turned into a black orphan

boy and black orphan girl. They do all the cleaning and housework

while the black couple is out but disappear when they return.

They were spotted due to a neighbor. Yet, they had to get a

magic charm to make the children reappear briefly. Then,

they finally figure out how to take off the spell permanently,

so that the children never disappear. I love this happy story.

The whole concept of the story takes my mind to another place.

I wish this story was possible in real life. I describe the

story as mysterious. I had so much fun reading this.

The whole perspective is fresh and new. It impressed me

compared to the other children’s books I read but didn’t

get into. I rate this story a 10 out of 10 and it is number 1

out of my top 10.

The story is called “The Secret of the Stones” and it is

retold by Robert. D. San SOuci. The pictures

are by James Ransome. The publisher is Phyllis Fogelman

books and the state of publishing is New York.

Photo credit: Anton Vakulenko via Foter.com / CC BY-SA

Clementine Hunter, an African AMerican woman so jazzy with her oil paints!!

 

Clementine Hunter, an African AMerican woman born 1886,

was a folk artist who use to spend time in the cotton fields.

Oh, what a blessing. She spent her time in the cotton fields.

Later on in life, she worked in the house, which gave her a chance to

try out her sewing skills. She would save up small, left over scraps

of material and turned that into fabulous quilts. The plantation owner

encouraged her to make quilts and baskets in her spare time.

She tried to try and mark a painting just like the artist. She

showed someone name Francois the picture she had painted during

the night. This was the first picture she showed to anyone besides

her family. Francois encouraged her to paint more. She then

began to paint on different items such as :paper bags, use bottles,

cardboard boxes, and iron pots. Francois made sure Clementine

always had a nice supply of oil paints because she could not pay

for them herself.

Pretty soon, she was able to sell her works and turn around

and get her own paints and a suitable canvas. In 1955, the Delgado

Museum in New Orleans gave an exhibition of her work.Francois

suggested that Clementine paint wood panels for the house.

She painted nine murals, showing different scenarios on the plantations.

Her work became popular with big city art galleries  and shown

at museums too. She sold alot of her paintings, most to friends

for small amounts of money. Eventually, she was able to get her

own trailer. The moral of the story is to work for what you want.

Someone around you can inspire you on what field or career

to go into. Well, she is just one of the many talents that

exists in Black History. Hunter lived to be a 101 years of age.

credited to: Great African AMericans in the Arts by Carlotta Hacker.

 

 

How Black men and white men worked on the highway of ALaska together!

photo credit: davidyuweb Fleet Week San Francisco 2016 via photopin (license)

Ofcourse Some white people are quick to dismiss the black man’s talents.

Now if you know black history, you know us black people do it and we

do it better. We do it big. We are the meal, the snack, and the cake with

icing and sprinkles and a nice drink to go with it. We just outdo ourselves.

More black people should help other black people. It’s really a competition

with white people and black people. It’s not black people and black people.

That’s just how it’s set up.

Moving onto the story.  The little people thought that African American

engineers were not skilled and industrious as White people. This is so not true. It was an

experiment done with white men and black men to work on the same

project. They did not want African Americans to work in cold climates.

Black men and white men worked on the same highway. Yet,

it was still segregated. The African American engineers were not

allowed to have bulldozers and other machinery. The 95th Engineer

Regiment, who was the final African American unit transferred to

the highway, had more experience operating equipment. Yet,

the all white people of the 35 regiment was given the machinery.

African Americans were given hand tools. You see how backwards

some people are? But the brilliant and bold African Americans

are so magnificent they can get something done with pure labor.

On October 25, 1953, an African American soldier and

a white bulldozer driving soldier shook hands. This was the

final link of the Alaska Highway! They were photographed

as equals coming together to beat the Axis Powers.

It was now 1942, when the highway was completed.

The engineers who had labored so hard and were transferred to

other arenas in the war, including the South Pacific

and Europe. There, thirty men died during the construction

of the highway. Memorials for the veterans are spread

throughout the highway, including the Black Veterans

Memorial Bridge, which came into effect in 1993.

Thus, it was truly hard work to work on this project.

This is just one instance of black people and white people

working together.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/biography/alaska-men/

Martin Davis, a young African American designer for General Motors designs cars!

 

 

chrysler I’ve seen so many cars. I see my top three favorite cars most

often. So I decided to look up which cars are designed by

African Americans. I knew this would be a fun topic.

So listen, his is what  I found. Martin Davis, a

black man has led the exterior lighting and design studio

for the automaker’s North American division, the team responsible

for the exterior lighting for every brand under the General Motors

umbrella.

Davis knew he had a love for design and innovation since elementary

school. HE did not like the HOT wheels and lego sets. They just

did not keep his attention. He also did not like the toys in

toy stores, so this creative black youth made his own.

The Detroit area native collected empty cardboard boxes used to transport

fruits and veggies from the grocery store. He brung them home and just

started cutting. He molded shapes with glue, tape and constructions

paper.. Their was a small closet in the entryway of his parents house,

with enough room for a chair and his creations, interior designs for

a car that includes a dashboard and center console. He invited

his friends to test drive the car and come out with a new model

once a month.

His father thought kids playing with cardboard in their

closet was a safety concern. Thus he shut the operation down.

He still sent his sketches into Ford and was just in middle school.

He waited and thought nothing would come of his work. A

Ford employee sent his work to the design department. He

got a follow up letter from the design department with some

career advice and a list of schools. HE really really wanted

to attend the College for Creative Studies in detroit , michigan

out of the choices he had been sent.

He got the design managers attention and they took his

sketches and plastered them on a 20 foot wall in his studio

at GM. The auto company allowed him the opportunity to

travel to Birmingham, England to work at an advanced

design studio that mainly focused on Cadillacs.

Davis and his team were responsible for the exterior lighting

responsibilities for three well known programs- the GMC Acadia, Chevy

Traverse, and the Buick Enclave. And as you can see,

this is a process. He worked and worked to master

his craft. You must do one step before you can make

the other . There’s more to the story of the brilliant black man

in the car designing, here:

http://www.blackpressusa.com/black-designer-lights-up-gm/

 

 

 

 

Robert Smalls, the black slave who sailed his way to freedom!

 

chains

Do you the different ways black slaves escaped to freedom?

Do you know about Henry Box Brown, the black man who

mailed himself to freedom? Well, in order to survive, the

black slaves had to be clever, unique, innovative and creative.

They had to have a strong will and they sure did motivate

others to freedom. This reminds me of one particular

black slave named Robert Smalls.

Robert Smalls and a crew of fellow slaves were together

without the white captain and his two mates. Now, it\

was the right time to try something clever and daring.

They slipped a cotton steamer off the dock, picked up

some family members, then slowly navigated their

way through the harbor. Smalls, doubled as the captain

even donning the captain’s wide brimmed straw hat to

help cover up his face. He then responded with proper

coded signals at two Confederate checkpoints, which includes

Fort Sumter itself and other defense positions.

It was all clear. Smalls sailed into the open seas. Once

he was outside of Confederate waters, he had

raised a white flag and surrendered his  ship to the

blockading Union fleet. In under 4 hours, Robert Smalls,

a black male slave had commandeered a heavy army

Confederate ship and its 17 black passengers from

slavery to freedom.

Can we give a round of applause to Robert Smalls for

his take charge leadership skills? He is a true

hero.

Which Slave Sailed Himself to Freedom?

Black owned Hospitals

stethoscope photo: Steth_on_Money steth_on_money.jpg

I mean here in Michigan I see alot of White doctors.
I’m like, where are the black doctors. There is
surely a need for them. I would love to see
more black doctors, both dark and yellow in color.
It don’t make sense for everything to be so white.
Yes, whites have their roles,but I would like to
see more black people as doctors. Now, let’s move
on to black hospitals. Where are the black hospitals?
I surely don’t know of any in michigan. Here are
some black hospitals for your viewing:

Freedmen’s Hospital was founded 1862 in Washington
by the Medical Division of the Freedmen’s Bureau
to give the medical care to slaves. This hospital
was located on the grounds belonging to
Howard University and was the only Federally
funded health care facility for blacks in the
nation.

It’s still around Howard University Hospital,
one of only 3 traditional black hospitals
left around. The Freedmen’s Bureau
stayed around for 4 years. During that time
a movement was started that paved the way
for some ninety new Negro Hospitals.

Lincoln Hospital was established by Dr. Aaron
MCDuffie Moore in 1901 when he convinced
Washington Duke that a hospital would be a
more useful thing than Duke’s idea of
building a monument on the Trinity Campus
to Honor negroes who had fought for the
confederacy.

Provident Hospital and Training School for Nurses,
the first black owned and operated hospital
in America, was established in 1891 by
Dr. Daniel Hale Williams. Provident provided
training for nursese and interns in Chicago.
Black patients were denied admission to
white hospitals. Therefore, black physicians
could not treat their patients.

In 1944, there were 125 black hospitals in America
catering to black patients. Of these 124 hospitals,
23 were fully approved by the American College
of Surgeons and three were provisionally approved.
these institutions were found in 23 states and the
District of Columbia.

Oh, and now that I think about it i saw a black
woman doctor in Deaborn Heights, Michigan. It was
refreshing and such a change.

Saint Agnes Hospital founded 1886 in Raleigh,
North Carolina on the grounds of St. Augustine’s College.
It had its share of handicaps. Despite that , it
was only well equipped hospital for blacks
between Washington And New Orleans. It served
North Carolina, adjacent Virginia and South Carolina.

http://guides.mclibrary.duke.edu/blackhistorymonth/hospitals