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William Henry Lane created American tap dance from blending African rhythms and Irish jig and reel!

 Tap Shoes//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

There’s so many types of dances. Can you count them all? I mean

every single one. I love to dance freestyle to Rihanna’s music.

I swear she have some of the best remixes and original songs

I’ve ever heard. Her music inspires me to dance the days away.

Enough about that. The reason I’m writing is to tell the story of

a Black man who is influential in the creation of American

tap dance.

Lane developed a unique way of using his body as a

musical instrument, combining African derived syncopated

rhythms with movements of the Irish jig and reel. He was free

born in Providence, Rhode Island around 1825. Lane started

to learn the Irish jig and reel from Uncle Jim Lowe, a dance

hall and saloon performer in New York City, New York.

By the age of ten, Lane was performing in Paradise Square

in the Five Points District of New York, where a heavy concentration

of African AMerican and Irish populations were side by side. The

vernacular dance forms of both of these ethnic group intermingled,

providing Lane opportunity to get the different rhythmic and movement

foundations that facilitated the development of his style of dance.

Lance has an original use of different areas of his feet to

create rhythms, keep time, and  improvise complex syncopated

rhythms. This was revolutionary for the 1840s. He used his heels

to make the deeper tones of the bass drum, and balls of his feet to

layer, softer higher sounds. And to keep with his African oral traditions,

Lane included singing and laughter into his performances. This

added another layer to his rhythmic creations.
 

  The combining of the rhythm, footwork, improvisation

and vocals, Lane formed a blended style of African dance and British

Isles folk dance still seen today. Students studying tap in the

21st century can give credit to the styles they learn from Lane.

This man I must say is like a human instrument. What a way to stand out!

I just had to give this man credit. He is better than ordinary, he is

extraordinary. We need more people like him. By the way, did you know

dancers and choreographers make 16.85 per hour according to the
bureau of labor statisitics? (https://www.bls.gov/ooh/entertainment-and-
sports/dancers-and-choreographers.htm)

http://www.blackpast.org/aah/lane-william-henry-master-juba-1825-c-1852

 

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John Johnson was an African American prodigy who learned how to play the piano by age 4!

picture from: http://www.perfectlygrand.com/upright_and_grand_piano_covers.html
picture from:
http://www.perfectlygrand.com/upright_and_grand_piano_covers.html

I notice alot of black achievements. That is my job, to  observe and write about the accomplishmentsof black people. It’s what makes the world go round. Black people are inventors, musicians,sports players and much more. I need to hear more about what black people have done
in a good and optimistic light. Black people have been copied and have been an influential bunch of people. Thus, I must recognize a great black person named John R. Johnson.

John R. Johnson was an African American composer and arranger. He is from Jacksonville,
Florida. He learned to play the piano by age 4. He studied music at the New England Conservatory. In 1899, he and his brother James Weldon Johnson traveled to New York where
they met Robert Bob Cole. Together and assisted by James Weldon create over 150 songs over the next ten years.

Many were included into Broadway shows like Sleeping Beauty and the Best and Humpty Dumpty. Their most popular songs were “Under the Bamboo Tree, The Congo love SOng, and
Nobody’s Looking but the Owl and the Moon. Marie Cahill, Anna Held, George Primrose, and Lillian Russell made the songs popular.

Johnson and Cole produced several musical comedies like The Shoo-Fly Regiment 1906 and the Red Moon 1908, which were performed by an all black cast.

Johnson collaborated on the musical Hello Paris in 1911. A year later after Coles’ death,he performed in the London revue Come Over Here and became  the musical director of Hammerstein Opera House. Back in the states, he was a musical director of the Blackbirds of 1936 and made an appearance in Porgy and Bess, Mamba’s Daughter, and Cabin in the Sky. He
is best known for writing the music “Lift Every Voice and SIng”.

Johnson had a line up of great things he created. He was a super talented musical phenomenon.

http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/composer-extraordinaire-john-r-johnson

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/aima/hd_aima.htm

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Our Black people’s tradition of wearing church hats, particularly Black women!!!!

<IMG BORDER=”0″ ALIGN=”Left” SRC=”African Queen Style Church Hat“>US Black Women love our hats, especially the older church ladies in their 40s and 50s and above. It is a tradition of my Black elders. So one of my black elders
would not dare go to church without that perfect hat, at least most. It has
been an expression for women of all ages in the black race.

http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780385500869

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Willis Crosby, the black man whose habit is giving and helping our black people through radio!!!


Who is Willis H. Crosby? Willis H. Crosby is a Black
Radio legend. He first stepped onto the microphone
September 16, 1947 at WAIM studios. His radio
career continued at WANS and lasted till Feb 1997.

He is noted as the first Black disk jockey in Upstate
South Carolina. Crosby recruited national gospel
and rhythm and blues artists like the Williams
Brothers, the Swannee Quintet, the Five blind
Boys, Sam Cooke and Soul Steerers, Percy
Sledge, Dee Clark, and Joe Simon to
Anderson.

The proceeds coming from concerts were
promoted by Crosby and sponsored scholarships
to deserving students to attend college.
Mr. Crosby raised food, toys, and clothing
for families that are in need.

He used his show as a bridge to influence
and sponsor numerous causes. Willis took
many children to Atlanta for professional
baseball games and those people got to
see radio upclose through his “DJ for a day”
program. Trips like that make the biggest
impact on a child’s life. Some of that
career field might just rub off on them
and even the desire to be humanitarians.
It would be great to have generation and
generation of people to do that. The thing
is though that I read online that us Black
people are the most charitable.

Continuing on, he did custodial work at WANS
and the handling of his show’s advertising and
production duties. One of his quotes is “Anything
that’s legal is good work.

Mr. Crosby’s facilitated appearances in area
schools to further positive human relations. He
promoted both local talent and professional concerts to
raise money for food,clothing, scholarships for the
economically disadvantaged, and money to supply
a room at the Anderson Memorial Hospital.

This his persistence to keep going on, he received
many awards from the South Carolina General
Assembly and from local religious, educational,
and civic and charitable organizations.

The moral of the story is that the more people
to help and do something or be a part of
something great, the better the world is. Also,
we give to help others but in the process
when we give, we get back. Sometimes
what we give back is the same blessing,
one of equal value, or better.

http://scafricanamericanhistory.com/honorees/view/2004/5/

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Augusta Baker, the African American Librarian who worked in the City Public Library System!

Two loves of my life
Here’s a very special
tribute to black librarians. Round of
applause to Augusta Baker. She is one of
OUr Black people whowas a librarian.I
want to see more Black Librarians
in all states.Anyways, Augusta Baker lived in Baltimore Maryland and
moved to Columbia when her career ended.

And ofcourse being a librarian is not just so simple.
In order to be a librarian a person must have a degree.
I was so surprised to figure that out.

Augusta Baker is taken care of. She a literary phenomenon who got her degree in Library science from New York State
College.

Her routine is that she would light a candle,
then tell a story. Augusta Baker open children’s
eyes to literature. Her passion was doing
dramatic storytelling and was so glad to
entertain them.

On the list, Ms. Baker was number 6 of
100 most important library figures in our
nation’s history. What makes her so memorable
is all she does and that she worked
in the City Public Library System.

Just in time, she began work there in 1937.
That was the start of a time when children’s
literature depicted African Americans. Baker
set up a list of positive of books that showed
off positive, realtistic images of African Americans.
This encouraged authors and artists to make
original works of children’s fiction out of the black
experience.

She took on the position as Storyteller in Residence
at the University of South Carolina.Augusta
shows children that if you have a vision
put it out there.Let it be seen and heard.

Her parents and grandparents introduce her
to books at a really young age. Baker
graduated at New YOrk State College.

At 26, Baker did her first library job at
New York Public Library’s 135 Street
in Harlem. Going in, she thought this was be
a temporary job. But Guess what? It lasted
17 years.See, just goes to show people never
know where things will lead. Just like the
volunteer can lead himself or herself in the
job, think about other positions lead to
higher positions. With being a volunteer
can be rewarding like having a job. But she
is the true representation of doing it big.

So her long term job gave her the opportunity
to found James Weldon John Memorial Collection
of Children’s books right there. This collection
correctly portrays black children and black life.
That led her to become one of the top administrators
in the country. She took over children’s services.

There was a time where she was a consultant to
Sesame’s Street tv show.So there you go, if you
know any kids who watch Sesame Street,
that’s something to tell them.

People even got creative in their way
To bring her more attention, recognition
and honor. The College Library and
Information Science, joined with the Richland
County Public Library, to founded the annual
Augusta Baker’s Dozen Storytelling Festival
because of her.

Like her desire to tell children’s stories,
I desire to write children’s stories.I think
I will try that one day.Her being so driven
can drive somebody else.Kudos!!

http://scafricanamericanhistory.com/honorees/view/2006/1/

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Obama half dollar coins waiting to be bought and sold!


Well, I’m so enthused that Obama is President of America.
I’m so thrilled that I just keep advertising him and his products.
God has put OBama in charge and he gives me such glory.
Well you know how they have those half dollar coins and
they are so rare. I don’t know why they are rare or where
they come from. But now is our chance to have the Obama
coin in a half dollar form. It’s sitting there looking good
because Obama’s picture is on it. Imagine how that would
look sitting up on a shelf or wall or in a plaque or wherever
else you could put it.

Details:

This coin is layered in genuine 24 karat gold.

The serial numbered certificate is the real thing.

https://www.officialobamacoin.com/Default.aspx?mid=523911#order

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Pearl Fryar, the black man who is a topiary artist with his works in a South Carolina Museum!!!

Pearl Fryar Topiary Demonstration 23
(Pearl Fryar above and below)
Well, there’s something very inviting about a beautiful garden.
If you see it, it’s like a dream place that you want to dive in or
walk in rather. I’ve seen pictures of topiary online like a clock
and other things. Topiary art is truly superb. But rarely do
we hear the news talk about our black people doing topiary art.
Well, great news! Pearl Fryar, a Black man age 68 is a topiary
artist. He has trimmed the bushes and yard stuff to such delight.

He’s in South Carolina, a place I plan to go.
The man is so skilled, he now has a documentary
out about himself doing topiary works. “A Man Named
Pearl is the name of his documentary. It is
directed by Scott Galloway and Brent Pierson.

Synopsis: This documentary shows show the son
of an African AMerican sharecropper gets around
all the bigotry and racism. He takes junk plants
and transforms them for the better to be
the “attention getting” and dazzling topiary art forms.
His work has taken several decades of trimming
and tweaking. Thousands of people are rushing to
see his garden, a 3 and a half acre backyard.

Before he became topiary king, people complained
saying he did not keep up his yard. That’s why
people never know who they are talking
to or standing next to or living next to.
If they only knew. But ofcourse I’m
sure they found out.Well, the
man gave his yard a makeover.

It was Jackie Robinson that inspired
Pearl to know his dreams could come true
even though Jackie did baseball and Pearl
does topiary art. So Pearl fashioned plants into
figurative forms, 20 foot geometric compositions
and letters that show his love.

ANd what an innate ability he has to do this.
He had absolutely no training in horticulture.
So he taught himself. All Pearl’s topiary
designs are a vision. Like the fashion designer
has a vision so does Pearl in his topiary art.

If you like gardens, have one or just curious
about them, the film gives away Pearl’s
secrets. The secrets are pretty easy and basic.
Sprays and fertilizers are things
he does NOT use to protect the plants.
Pearl does NOT even have a watering
system. In place of that, he digs
trenches around the plants that collect
rainwater. So his kind of gardening is
very different.

Pearl has got it going on as you can see.
He has a permanent collection of the South
Carolina State Museum in Columbia. He is known
nationally for his exceptional garden by the
Perservation Project of the Garden Conservancy.

ANd more than just topiary, Pearl wants to help
students who don’t test well to discover what
they are good at so they can acheieve through
hard work He lectures in public schools,
colleges, church groups, etc.

To sum it all up, success is like stairs, you
must walk from the bottom to get to the top.
You don’t just take the elevator in success.

Source of article written:
http://chelseanow.com/cn_95/topiarypearls.html

Video trailer and more information about his documentary in topiary art
http://www.amannamedpearl.com/

Pearl Fryar Topiary Demonstration 26