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William Henry Lane created American tap dance from blending African rhythms and Irish jig and reel!

 Tap Shoes//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

There’s so many types of dances. Can you count them all? I mean

every single one. I love to dance freestyle to Rihanna’s music.

I swear she have some of the best remixes and original songs

I’ve ever heard. Her music inspires me to dance the days away.

Enough about that. The reason I’m writing is to tell the story of

a Black man who is influential in the creation of American

tap dance.

Lane developed a unique way of using his body as a

musical instrument, combining African derived syncopated

rhythms with movements of the Irish jig and reel. He was free

born in Providence, Rhode Island around 1825. Lane started

to learn the Irish jig and reel from Uncle Jim Lowe, a dance

hall and saloon performer in New York City, New York.

By the age of ten, Lane was performing in Paradise Square

in the Five Points District of New York, where a heavy concentration

of African AMerican and Irish populations were side by side. The

vernacular dance forms of both of these ethnic group intermingled,

providing Lane opportunity to get the different rhythmic and movement

foundations that facilitated the development of his style of dance.

Lance has an original use of different areas of his feet to

create rhythms, keep time, and  improvise complex syncopated

rhythms. This was revolutionary for the 1840s. He used his heels

to make the deeper tones of the bass drum, and balls of his feet to

layer, softer higher sounds. And to keep with his African oral traditions,

Lane included singing and laughter into his performances. This

added another layer to his rhythmic creations.
 

  The combining of the rhythm, footwork, improvisation

and vocals, Lane formed a blended style of African dance and British

Isles folk dance still seen today. Students studying tap in the

21st century can give credit to the styles they learn from Lane.

This man I must say is like a human instrument. What a way to stand out!

I just had to give this man credit. He is better than ordinary, he is

extraordinary. We need more people like him. By the way, did you know

dancers and choreographers make 16.85 per hour according to the
bureau of labor statisitics? (https://www.bls.gov/ooh/entertainment-and-
sports/dancers-and-choreographers.htm)

http://www.blackpast.org/aah/lane-william-henry-master-juba-1825-c-1852

 

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Savion Glover is an African American Tap Dancer who has repeatedly been on Sesame Street!

The multitalented Savion Glover is a black man that

is known for his tap dancing, choreography, and acting. He has

been in business since he was just a child. He was the youngest

person to get a scholarship in the Newark Community School of the Arts.

He had made his mark starring in a leading role in the Broadway musical

the Tap Dance Kid.

He had his own dancing style known as “free style hard core.

The Tony Award winning dancer worked with super great individuals

like Gregory Hines and Sammy Davis. Jr. He has blown audiences

away with his roles in major motion pictures like Jelly’s Last Jam.

This role earned him the National Endownment for the Arts grant,

which he made history for. He was the youngest ever recipient for that

specific grant. As a choreographer, Glover’s work has helped to

keep tap dancing as an art form in the modern dance world.  He

starred in the musical “Bring in da Noise, Bring in da Funk” which

he himself choreographed. He got a Tony for best choreographer.

He has reappeared on Sesame Street numerous time.

And guess what? He’s behind the live dancing motion behind Mumble

the peguin in the Disney film “Happy Feet”.  Yet again, he serves as an

choreographer.  Savion Glover’s success is truly a delight. He keeps

going in the right direction and is making BIG moves in his career.

I applaud him for what he does.

http://www.broadwaydancecenter.com/faculty/bios/glover_savion.shtml

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Chubby Checker bombarding the stage with the dance he invented ,”The twist”!!

Chubby Checker? Catchy name right? You bet. Well, he
was just as catchy as his name. A name like his is
memorable enough to sell records quick. He would
perform on Philadelphia. He was in a famous ad for Oreo
Cookies.

Born October 3, 1941, he took on jobs like shining
shoes, selling ice and assisting in a butcher’s shop.
His heroes? Only the top best like Fats Domino,
Jerry Lee Lewis, and Elvis Presley made his list.
He performed in church and on the streets in his
singing group, the Quantrells.

The music executives were running to get to him
like people running through Walmart like people
who found out about a 50% discount on laptops.
He signed with Cameo Parkway Records in 1959.
He even came up with a song called “The Twist” .
Also, He was labeled “King of the twist.” What
a calling! Not only that folks, he INVENTED
the dance the Twist. Let’s get down with him.

The twist, as a a dance movement revolutionized
popular culture, giving a smooth transitioning
for couples to break up on the dance floor.

He makes me want to try! Amazing! Count on
Chubby Checkers to zoom into action. Vocal
cords that speak volumes and the feet that
keep the beat…What an amazing man! High
five on his kind of talent.

http://www.biography.com/people/chubby-checker-9542332
http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/chubby-checker-ernest-evans-1941

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Bill Bojangles, a black man who could run 75 yards in 8.2 seconds, a tap dancing legend!1

Do you like to tap? Can you tap dance circles around competition? Professionals do this. Anyways, I’m drawing in inspirations for tap dance right up our alley, right here in our black race. We all here about what Europeans do. That’s routine. What do our black people do?

Lets learn about what our black people do. It never gets boring.
Shuffle and tap? Does it sound familiar? Well, a black man who goes
by the name of Bill “Bojangles” Robinson created some of those moves.
He was a resident of Richmond, Virginia. One of his big to do dances
was the stair dance.

Yet when he was little, he went to the oddest
place to perform.Robinson performed at local
Beer gardens at age 6. By the time he was eight,
he was dancing for pennies.He was taking over
the show “vaudeville” which Includes dancers,
singers, comedians, and actors. When he became
a young adult, he got the most out of his money
dancing in vaudeville circuit and
nightclubs.
And who was he dancing near? Shirley
Temple ofcourse. This man jumped into the scene, completing
fourteen films. He was tapping his sweet rhythms through
the scene with Lena Horne in her African American production,
Stormy Weather.

By the time he was 61, he was still dancing all peppy
(energetic) down the street of broadway. Yes, people,
take a closer look at Bill Robinson, or Bojangles,
Just like the restaurant Bojangles. Ofcourse this
star was copied. The best always are.

His dancing skills give a patina of quality to the
other white acts. He was simply better. Yet as humble
as can be, he never decided not to appear at an event
with less successful people. With his great adaptability,
he was doing different shows in different locations.

That’s right, keeping his talent alive and making
big steps in life. He never gave up. And when I said tap dance
circles around people, the man was tapping dancing in circles on
those steps. You can see that in the youtube video above.

And we must highlight something else.
We are all so familiar with running forwards, but Robinson,
could run backwards, 75 yards in 8.2 seconds.

http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/gilded/jb_gilded_bojangle_3.html
http://www.biography.com/people/bill-bojangles-robinson-9460594

Bill "Bojangles" Robinson

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Plenty of yarn pictures that’s good on the eyes!!!

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Magic Yarn Ball Swap
green sock yarns
Tiger Handspun Yarn
New yarn- yum
Sock Yarn
Sock yarn winding party
Sock Yarn
Lang Yarns - From Amsterdam

Handspun Sunshine Yarns sw merino in Drift
Rainbow Ribbon/Yarn for Etsy Swap Madness
Yarn-Sonoma