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The cartoon character Betty Boop was inspired by a black jazz singer in Harlem!

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Well, we are the originals.They are copies. White

people stole credit on different things that black people did.

Black people have invented alot to help the world be better

and make our lives easier.  We black people are the inspiration

for ideas, concepts, sciences, math, education, style, music,

dance, and much more.

Thus, I’m speaking about the iconic cartoon character Betty

Boop, who was inspired by a black jazz singer in Harlem. Max Fleischer

introduced her in 1930. She was the first and most famous sex symbol in

animation. Betty Boop is  well known for her revealing dress,

curvaceous figure and signature vocals BOOp OOP a Doop.

While there has been controversy over the years, the inspiration has been

traced back to Esther Jones who was known as Baby Esher and performed

mostly in the Cotton Club during the 1920s.

Baby Esther’s trademark vocal style of using boops and other

childlike scat sounds gained the attention of actress Helene Kane

during a performance in the late 20s. After observing Baby Esther,

Kane took on her style and began using boops in her songs as well.

Helene Kane, who found fame earlier on, often included this baby style

into her music. When Betty Boop was introduced, Kane promptly sued

Fleischer and Paramount Publix Corporation informing the public

that they were using her image and style.

Video evidence came to the light of Baby Esther performing

in a nightclub. The courts then ruled that Helene Kane did not

have the exclusive rights to the booping style or image and it predated her.

Baby Esther’s baby style did not bring her mainstream fame and she died

in obscurity. Yet, a piece of her lives on in the iconic character Betty

Boop.

We don’t learn this type of material inside schools usually so

you just have to dig deeper. What else don’t we know about black history?

Well, we need to learn it because everything about black history matters.

http://www.pbs.org/black-culture/explore/10-black-history-little-known-facts/#.Wf4XZ9KnHcs

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Albert White, African American builder who built Western Michigan University!

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Do you know of any black builders off the top of your head?
Can you scan your brain for one? Well, Albert White was an African
American building contractor.

He and his men worked together to build a number of well
known structures in Kalamazoo history. Mr. White and
his workers built an addition to the original Borgess
Hospital. At that time it was in a house on Portage
Street. He also constructed the 3rd Kalamazoo Central
High School in 1898. He supervised the masonry work in
the building of the Administration Building East Hall,
which was the first building of the original campus of
Western Michigan University. Western Michigan University
was built in 1905 and still stands.

He moved to Kalamazoo and began working for a mason. He
begged his employer to teach him the trade but was initially
turned down. His employer changed his mind after White offered to
work for free for several months in exchange for learning the trade.
This agreement eventually turned into an apprenticeship that lasted
for seven years, followed by 2 years of working as a journeyman.

Albert White was 25 years of age when he started his own
construction contracting business. Over the next 30 years he would
be involved in many vital projects, including the building the 3rd
Kalamazoo Central High school, additions ot the Kalamazoo Paper Mill,
Plainwell High School, and the first Borgess Hospital on Portage Street.

This man was pretty resourceful and skilled. It goes to show you
that it takes sacrifice in order to get somewhere in life. Thus,
I produce this quote. Work hard so you can have it better later.

http://www.kpl.gov/local-history/black-history/albert-white.aspx

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Black Seamen served vital roles!

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How many black seamen have you heard of? Did you hear of James

Forten? Anyways, Black people have taken on many roles in life. So I try to

think of the roles that black people take the least of. There are

roles that black people take the most of . But I like to highlight

something special about each role that black people do

and how we as black people have shown our brilliance. Moving on.

The Navy recruited both the free and enslave black people

from the start of the Revolutionary War. Many black people were already

experienced sailors that served in British and state navies. Philadelphia’s

free blacks were more likely to serve on privateers than in the

Pennsylvania navy. Black seamen were specifically valued as pilots.

Others took on roles as shipyard carpenters and laborers.

Maryland and Virginia’s navies made extensive use of blacks, even

buying slaves for wartime naval service. Virginia’s state commissioner

noted that it was cheaper to hire blacks than whites and that white

people got exemption from military service by substituting a slave.

In his memoirs, US. Navy Commodore James Barron, who served

as a captain in the Virginia navy during the war, remembered

several black men among the “Courageous patriots who…in justice

to their merits should not be forgotten.

Whatever we do, we do it big” by me.

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part2/2p51.html

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William Henry Lane created American tap dance from blending African rhythms and Irish jig and reel!

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There’s so many types of dances. Can you count them all? I mean

every single one. I love to dance freestyle to Rihanna’s music.

I swear she have some of the best remixes and original songs

I’ve ever heard. Her music inspires me to dance the days away.

Enough about that. The reason I’m writing is to tell the story of

a Black man who is influential in the creation of American

tap dance.

Lane developed a unique way of using his body as a

musical instrument, combining African derived syncopated

rhythms with movements of the Irish jig and reel. He was free

born in Providence, Rhode Island around 1825. Lane started

to learn the Irish jig and reel from Uncle Jim Lowe, a dance

hall and saloon performer in New York City, New York.

By the age of ten, Lane was performing in Paradise Square

in the Five Points District of New York, where a heavy concentration

of African AMerican and Irish populations were side by side. The

vernacular dance forms of both of these ethnic group intermingled,

providing Lane opportunity to get the different rhythmic and movement

foundations that facilitated the development of his style of dance.

Lance has an original use of different areas of his feet to

create rhythms, keep time, and  improvise complex syncopated

rhythms. This was revolutionary for the 1840s. He used his heels

to make the deeper tones of the bass drum, and balls of his feet to

layer, softer higher sounds. And to keep with his African oral traditions,

Lane included singing and laughter into his performances. This

added another layer to his rhythmic creations.
 

  The combining of the rhythm, footwork, improvisation

and vocals, Lane formed a blended style of African dance and British

Isles folk dance still seen today. Students studying tap in the

21st century can give credit to the styles they learn from Lane.

This man I must say is like a human instrument. What a way to stand out!

I just had to give this man credit. He is better than ordinary, he is

extraordinary. We need more people like him. By the way, did you know

dancers and choreographers make 16.85 per hour according to the
bureau of labor statisitics? (https://www.bls.gov/ooh/entertainment-and-
sports/dancers-and-choreographers.htm)

http://www.blackpast.org/aah/lane-william-henry-master-juba-1825-c-1852

 

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The Nicholas Brothers are two black men who do a blend of tap, jazz, ballet, and acrobatic moves!

picture from: http://www.aliexpress.com/tap-shoes-dance_reviews.html
picture from:
http://www.aliexpress.com/tap-shoes-dance_reviews.html

Black people are these super talented bunch of people. We do things with style, grace, and  pizzazz. It always impresses me to hear black people doing well. We were born to do great things. Black people have a history of doing the most amazing things. If you know about the accomplishments of black people, you know that we are a blessing. So what brings me to the topic of black success? Well,the Nicholas Brothers come to mind.

The Nicholas Brothers are a African American dancing team. Fayard and Harold Nicholas careers spanned over 6 decades. They were recognized for their most memorable appearances in over 30 Hollywood musicals in 30s and 40s era. This includes Down Argentine Way, Sun Valley Serenade, and Stormy Weather.

Their artistry, choreographic brillance, and most unique style was a smooth blend of tap, jazz, ballet, and acrobatic moves that eeatntertained vaudeville, theatre, film, and television audiences all around the globe.

Their natural talents were honed early on in life. Their parents just so happened to be musicians that led the orchestra at the Standard Theatre in Philadelphia.

In 1932, when they first short film Pie, Pie Blackbird with Eubie Blake. Fayard and Harold opened at the Cotton Club, at the ages of 18 and 11.

They worked with such great and talented people like Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington, and Ethel Wathers.

Samuel Goldwyn spotted them at the fashionable club and invited them to do their first movie, Kid Millions. In 1940, they were contracted to 20th century fox where they completed 6 films. The Brothers traveled around Europe with Bob Hope, Eve Arden, Fanny Brice  and Josephine Baker.

They also starred in Lew Leslie’s Blackbirds of 1936. Fayard and Harold kept performing in  Broadway, Off Broadway, and theatre productions throughout the United States and Europe until the 1980s.

In 1981, they were honored by the  Academy Awards tv special. Fayard got a Tony Award for his choreography in the broadway show Black and Blue in 1989. Harold got the Dea Award or Dance Educators of America, Bay Area Critics Circle Award for Best Principal Performance in Stompin at the Savoy, and the Harbor Performing Arts Center Lifetime Achievement Award.OTher awards and honors include Black Film makers Hall of Fame, Elle Award, National Film Society, Apollo Theaters Hall of Fame, First Class Inductees, Ebony Lifetime Achievement Award, Kennedy Center Honors,The National Black Media Coalition Lifetime Achievement Award, Flo-bert Award, New York’s Tap Dance Committee, Gypsy Award,and the Professional Dancer’s Society Dance Magazine Award of 1995.

In 1994, the Brothers got their long overdue star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame.

The Brothers have got out and pursued their dreams to the fullest. This  what more people ought to be doing. I even have to repeat the fact that they got their star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame.

http://www.blackpast.org/aah/nicholas-brothers

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John Johnson was an African American prodigy who learned how to play the piano by age 4!

picture from: http://www.perfectlygrand.com/upright_and_grand_piano_covers.html
picture from:
http://www.perfectlygrand.com/upright_and_grand_piano_covers.html

I notice alot of black achievements. That is my job, to  observe and write about the accomplishmentsof black people. It’s what makes the world go round. Black people are inventors, musicians,sports players and much more. I need to hear more about what black people have done
in a good and optimistic light. Black people have been copied and have been an influential bunch of people. Thus, I must recognize a great black person named John R. Johnson.

John R. Johnson was an African American composer and arranger. He is from Jacksonville,
Florida. He learned to play the piano by age 4. He studied music at the New England Conservatory. In 1899, he and his brother James Weldon Johnson traveled to New York where
they met Robert Bob Cole. Together and assisted by James Weldon create over 150 songs over the next ten years.

Many were included into Broadway shows like Sleeping Beauty and the Best and Humpty Dumpty. Their most popular songs were “Under the Bamboo Tree, The Congo love SOng, and
Nobody’s Looking but the Owl and the Moon. Marie Cahill, Anna Held, George Primrose, and Lillian Russell made the songs popular.

Johnson and Cole produced several musical comedies like The Shoo-Fly Regiment 1906 and the Red Moon 1908, which were performed by an all black cast.

Johnson collaborated on the musical Hello Paris in 1911. A year later after Coles’ death,he performed in the London revue Come Over Here and became  the musical director of Hammerstein Opera House. Back in the states, he was a musical director of the Blackbirds of 1936 and made an appearance in Porgy and Bess, Mamba’s Daughter, and Cabin in the Sky. He
is best known for writing the music “Lift Every Voice and SIng”.

Johnson had a line up of great things he created. He was a super talented musical phenomenon.

http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/composer-extraordinaire-john-r-johnson

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/aima/hd_aima.htm

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Sheryl Jones, an African American jewelry designer is dazzling the world with her creations!

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picture from: http://www.stephanhoglund.com/catinfo.cfm/CatID/finej

SHe has been doing jewelry design since 1998. She began working for a diamond manufacturer in New York CIty.  Jones ended her career in television working for MTV. SHe took up a course at the Gemological Institute of America on Fifth Avenue. That is a reputable business and they also do well at grading diamonds. She has taken alot of courses trying to decide what to do and get outside of her head. She took a week’s length diamond course and received her diamond certificate. Jones was focused on finding a job and after checking the job board she found an opening with a Belgian man who was opening a family office in Antwerp.

She had offered to do publicity for his brand if he could teach her how to sort diamonds.

Alot of people began asking her to make jewelry like engagement rings, wedding bands, and pendants. That’s how her designing career began. She left David, her mentor and opened her studio on 39th Street and started taking customer orders. For the demand, she designed cuff links and sold them at Sean Jean and Michael C. Fina. That showed itself to be a successful venture and through that she was introduced to a new company, which was a larger manufacturer. They asked her to design diamond jewelry and to manage retail space. They also provided her with the chance to see her pieces.

Her inspiration is in the stones. It all began there. Jones’ current collection is a departure from her usual design ethic. That ethic is to make clean, classic, and timeless pieces. This line is for those people who like what’s unique.

There’s more to the story here: http://www.essence.com/2011/06/15/bling-fling-a-jeweler-tells-all/