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The cartoon character Betty Boop was inspired by a black jazz singer in Harlem!

Betty_Boop_Black_red

Well, we are the originals.They are copies. White

people stole credit on different things that black people did.

Black people have invented alot to help the world be better

and make our lives easier.  We black people are the inspiration

for ideas, concepts, sciences, math, education, style, music,

dance, and much more.

Thus, I’m speaking about the iconic cartoon character Betty

Boop, who was inspired by a black jazz singer in Harlem. Max Fleischer

introduced her in 1930. She was the first and most famous sex symbol in

animation. Betty Boop is  well known for her revealing dress,

curvaceous figure and signature vocals BOOp OOP a Doop.

While there has been controversy over the years, the inspiration has been

traced back to Esther Jones who was known as Baby Esher and performed

mostly in the Cotton Club during the 1920s.

Baby Esther’s trademark vocal style of using boops and other

childlike scat sounds gained the attention of actress Helene Kane

during a performance in the late 20s. After observing Baby Esther,

Kane took on her style and began using boops in her songs as well.

Helene Kane, who found fame earlier on, often included this baby style

into her music. When Betty Boop was introduced, Kane promptly sued

Fleischer and Paramount Publix Corporation informing the public

that they were using her image and style.

Video evidence came to the light of Baby Esther performing

in a nightclub. The courts then ruled that Helene Kane did not

have the exclusive rights to the booping style or image and it predated her.

Baby Esther’s baby style did not bring her mainstream fame and she died

in obscurity. Yet, a piece of her lives on in the iconic character Betty

Boop.

We don’t learn this type of material inside schools usually so

you just have to dig deeper. What else don’t we know about black history?

Well, we need to learn it because everything about black history matters.

http://www.pbs.org/black-culture/explore/10-black-history-little-known-facts/#.Wf4XZ9KnHcs

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